Gastronomy

Marta Traczyk, W Domu Restaurant

Pedagogue by education, restaurateur by vocation. Since 2020 she has been running the restaurant W Domu (“At Home”) in the Warsaw district of Tarchomin where she serves original dishes from ecological and local produce. She loves the smell of fresh herbs, there is always fresh marjoram, lupine and mallow in her garden. Marta is addicted to making syrup from pine shoots and elder. Mother of Helena and Marysia, she relaxes by playing koshi bells.

We only use fresh herbs. Of course, in autumn and winter we dry our own, or the ones from Rysiny, but in season we only use fresh herbs. For instance, in the broth made with guinea fowl, which we get from Masovia, there is no Vegeta, or Maggi, but there is an abundance of lovage. If someone didn’t know what lovage is, or the kids would ask what it was, with the herb garden on site we could show those people: look, this is where lovage grows, you can taste it. Kids are amazing, they are very curious, intuitive and brave, so they had no problem trying rosemary, thyme, begonia, lovage or marjoram.

Marta Traczyk, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Marta Traczyk, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
W Domu Restaurant, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
W Domu Restaurant, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
W Domu Restaurant, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
W Domu Restaurant, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
W Domu Restaurant, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Marta Traczyk, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
W Domu Restaurant, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
W Domu Restaurant, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 

 

You can find more information about W Domu Restaurant here

 

Back to top

Food cooperatives

Joanna Humka, Dobrze Cooperative

She works within climate education in the Center for Citizenship Education. In January 2020 she moved to Warsaw and immediately joined the cooperative whose activity she had followed for several years. Asia keeps looking for her place in the world and for ways to encourage people to build a better world for all beings.

Joining the cooperative made it remarkably easy to meet people who hold similar values, and treat others in a similar way as I do. For me, the cooperative means not only good and ecological food for which producers are decently reimbursed, but also practicing grass-roots democracy, discussions on the future of the initiative, talking to people in the shop, many wonderful connections, as well as experience in coordinating an educational project concerning social and solidary economics. The cooperative shows that it is possible to live differently, that a different world – more humane, based on social bonds and mutual help – is still possible.

Joanna Humka, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Joanna Humka, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Dobrze Cooperative, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Dobrze Cooperative, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Joanna Humka, photo: Kaarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Dobrze Cooperative, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Joanna Humka, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Dobrze Cooperative, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Dobrze Cooperative, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Dobrze Cooperative, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Dobrze Cooperative, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 

Joanna Humka is a member of the Warsaw cooperative Dobrze. You can find more information about their operations here

Examples of other cooperatives:

Mokotów Cooperative

OrganicLea, worker’s cooperative

Food Sharing Copenhagen

Back to top

Community gardens

Maciej Łepkowski, Motyka i Słońce Community Garden

Nature and culture animator. Co-founder of the Motyka i Słońce Community Garden in the Warsaw’s Osiedle Jazdów. Doctoral candidate in the Department of Landscape Art (Faculty of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Warsaw University of Life Sciences) where he works on informal green spaces. Since 2017 he has been co-creating the community garden support programme Bujna Warszawa.

A community garden is a place to which a group of people tends. It is simultaneously a recreational space, an educational space, and it serves a culture-formative purpose. It is a kind of para-institution of culture where the topics of ecology and cultivation are crucial, but they generate a number of other talking points. We meet regularly, every Sunday, to work in the garden. These meetings have the additional purpose of showing people and educating them on how you can grow vegetables in an environmentally-friendly way. Everyone who comes here gets a kind of gardening course inspired by permaculture. We also organise workshops for schools and preschools, as well as events for local government officials. Moreover, we carry out the Bujna Warszawa programme.

Maciej Łepkowski, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Maciej Łepkowski, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Motyka i Słońce Community Garden, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska 
Motyka i Słońce Community Garden, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska 
Motyka i Słońce Community Garden, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska 
Motyka i Słońce Community Garden, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Motyka i Słońce Community Garden, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Maciej Łepkowski, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Motyka i Słońce Community Garden, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Motyka i Słońce Community Garden, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Motyka i Słońce Community Garden, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Motyka i Słońce Community Garden, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 

You can find more information about the Motyka i Słońce Community Garden here

Bujna Warszawa is a Warsaw-based programme that supports establishing and developing community gardens in the city. You can find more information here

 

 

 

Back to top

Family garden allotments

Hanna Wielgus, Family Garden Allotments

She belongs to the third generation of Warsaw allotment gardeners. She has always been involved in the garden allotment movement, and she held various positions in the gardens’ administration and commissions; she also participated in social, cultural and advocacy activities. Her allotment is part of the oldest garden in Masovia established in 1902 in Warsaw.

Flowers bloom in my garden starting in February, winter aconites are the first ones, with yellow blooms. Then scillas come out, they are the tall ones with a line pine 20 centimetres high and bell-shaped flowers – they bloom for 6 weeks on a bush. They are not suitable for a vase. Then there are tulips, and later those tiny flowers. In autumn, there are asters, short, medium and tall, and they last until winter. I also have chrysanthemums which love the frost, they bloom when there’s frost.

Our allotments were established in 1902. We grew up on an allotment. The community once used to be very family-oriented, like one big family. A lot of work in the gardens was done as community actions, and not like it is now, only for financial participation. Community action was building a warehouse by the main alley, digging ditches for electricity cables, there were events for children organised in the so-called “duck pit”, there was an allotment mutual aid society. Right now, there is no more of that family ambiance in the allotments.

Hanna Wielgus, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Obrońców Pokoju Family Garden Allotments, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Hanna Wielgus, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Obrońców Pokoju Family Garden Allotments, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Obrońców Pokoju Family Garden Allotments, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Hanna Wielgus, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Hanna Wielgus, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Obrońców Pokoju Family Garden Allotments, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Obrońców Pokoju Family Garden Allotments, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Obrońców Pokoju Family Garden Allotments, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Obrońców Pokoju Family Garden Allotments, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 

As decided by the board of ROD im. Obrońców Pokoju (Family Garden Allotments) on 1 June 2021, Ms. Hanna Wielgus was deprived of the right to use the allotment no. 168. She was accused of neglecting the plot overgrown with weeds and self-seeders. Despite appeals, submitted letters and applications, the board still has not revoked its decision.

The petition for the defense of Ms. Hanna’s allotment can be signed here

 

You can find the history of the oldest garden allotments in the Masovia Province here (in Polish)

“Naprzód działki” is a Warsaw-based programme supporting sustainable development of gardens, allotment gardeners’ activation, as well as integration of inhabitants and supporting biodiversity of this unique urban spaces. More information here

Back to top

Community supported agriculture

Katarzyna Grzybek and Marcin Migała, CSA Marianka

Since 2017 they have been running an ecological farm CSA Marianka in the village of Marianów. They operate on the basis of the CSA model (Community Supported Agriculture). Once a week they personally deliver vegetables to Warsaw, Milanówek, Piotrków Trybunalski, Pabianice and Łódź, and they can dispatch a courier shipment to any address in Poland.

We grow vegetables on fixed patches (small fields) which we don’t plough and don’t tamp down with heavy machinery. Most of the work is done by hand. The total surface for growing vegetables is around 1 hectare and it looks like a backyard garden on a larger scale. Crops in CSA Marianka are dedicated to people within the circle of our farm. We want the members of our CSA to have access to as much variety of fresh vegetables as possible, coming from a single and – the most importantly – trustworthy source.

Katarzyna Grzybek and Marcin Migała, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Katarzyna Grzybek and Marcin Migała, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
CSA Marianka, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Marcin Migała, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
CSA Marianka, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Katarzyna Grzybek, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
CSA Marianka, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Katarzyna Grzybek and Marcin Migała, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
CSA Marianka, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
CSA Marianka, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
CSA Marianka, photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 

You can find more information about CSA Marianka here

You can find more information and contact details of farms based on the CSA model here (in Polish)

Back to top

Edible Cities Network

Edible Cities Network is a fully open, sustainable and constantly growing network of cities that are exploring sustainable methods of urban food production, distribution and consumption. Examples include urban farming, building-integrated agriculture, agroforestry, indoor and vertical farming, urban beekeeping, food surplus redistribution programmes, community kitchens, closed loop systems for sustainable resource management and urban food-related educational services.

https://www.edicitnet.com

Back to top

The City is Our Garden

The City is Our Garden
Manifesto

For a few years now new forms of collaborative gardens have been evolving in numerous cities. These urban community gardens are an experimental space for a good city life.
Together we, the city farmers, will transform fallow land into meeting places, harvest our own seeds, keep bees between and on top of high-rise buildings, experiment with various types of composting and exercise ourselves in preserving produce. We advocate a city worth living in and an urbanity that is future-oriented. A public space without access limitation or the obligation to consume is very important for a democratic and plural urban society. We are experiencing that on a daily basis.

Urban Community Gardens are:
· Common goods, opposing the increasing privatisation and commercialisation of public space
· A place of cultural, social and cross-generational variety and neighbourly collaboration
· A spot to experience nature, biodiversity, food sovereignty and seed preservation
· An ambience that welcomes participation in the form of designing, preserving and nourishing, thus creating an environment for the cooperative urban society to thrive in
· An experimental space to invent, form, re-use, repair and convert
· Ecological alternatives to soil sealing, fallow land and buffer strips
· Spanning the gap between city and rural agriculture by increasing awareness of high-quality food and that certain kind of agriculture which respects nature’s limitations and inherent worth, global justice and fair production conditions
· A place of environmental education, collective learning, trading and sharing
· Venues of quietness and shared time
· A contribution to a better climate, quality of life and environmental justice
· A vivid alternative to solitude, violence and anonymity.

In Summary

Urban gardens are part of a vivid and sustainable city that is worth living in. Their prominence and numbers are rising continuously. However, their legal status is nonetheless precarious and their continuity oftentimes uncertain. Many municipalities only consider the monetary value of an area, not its impact on the urban space and the metropolitan society.
We summon the politicians and urban planners to recognise the importance of community gardens, strengthen their position, integrate them in the construction and planning law and initiate a paradigm shift towards a garden-friendly city. Similar to the car-friendly city that granted every citizen the right to a parking space, the garden-friendly city should provide urban nature in walking distance. In practice this means:
· Providing the citizens with the right to shape the public place
· Guaranteeing close-to-home, public spaces for non-commercial use and as a learning facility to the citizens
· Implementing high-quality green space and urban nature while taking the needs of the different groups of humans, animals and plants into account.
Urban gardens are our habitat. This is where diversity is gathering, perspectives are growing and a sustainability-based society is evolving. We want our gardens to take root here. The city is our garden.

Why a Manifest?
Urban gardening is more than one’s individual quest for a beautifully designed haven in the city. There is a new collective movement forming around the phenomenon of collaborative gardening. The manifest is meant to express the political localisation of the urban garden movement and contribute to the discussions regarding the future of cities and the prominence of commons.

Who initiated it?
The Urban Gardening Manifest was initiated by activists from ‘Allmende-Kontor’, ‘Prinzessinnengarten’, ‘Kiezgarten’, ‘Neuland Köln’, as well as ‘Eine andere Welt ist pflanzbar’ and ‘anstiftung’.

What was the impetus?
Urban gardens are facing an increasing number of inquiries from large corporations and brand representatives, who want to utilise this ‘cool’ scenery for photo shoots. Guerrilla gardening and knitting events in public are staged for commercials, linking ‘applied practices’ to the sale of their products.
The urban gardening movement rejects this with a statement of their own, referring to the importance of public space without access limitation. Further, the urban gardening movement positions itself politically in alignment with the movement ‘Recht auf Stadt’, highlighting the importance of urban nature, collectively used, public space as well as ecological and inclusive urbanity.

How did it come about?
The developing process of the manifest consists of four main steps: In 2012, ‘anstiftung’ had hosted a convention at the Evangelistic Academy Tutzing titled ‘Do-it-yourself cultures. Spaces and networks of post-industrial productivity’. The culture-industrial usage of urban gardening projects mentioned above was discussed among other topics. Therefore, the idea to create a manifest originated and first drafts were written, which were debated by and developed within the group of initiators.
The second step was the national second summer camp 2013 in Berlin-Lichtenberg, where two current manifest drafts were discussed among 100 garden activists from all over Germany. An open editorial group formed itself during this event, working on the manifest continuously.
In parallel to the event network conference intercultural gardens 2014 in Goettingen a small team completed the final editorship of the draft successfully; ‘anstiftung’ managed the media realisation (professional text narration, text animation and website). Lastly, the finalised version was presented during the third summer camp of urban community gardens in Nuremberg in August 2014.

What is the goal?
The authors of the manifest aspire to create a social discourse about the importance of community gardens in a public space and about the prominence of urban nature for a liveable and fair-trading city in the world. They demand support from decision-makers in politics, planning and administration to comply with the importance of community gardens through definite regulation sustainably.

The Manifesto comes from https://urbangardeningmanifest.de

Back to top

Urban Farming and gardening potential

Urban farming has the potential to help address food security worldwide. The first global estimate found that, if fully implemented in cities around the world, urban farms could produce as much as 180 million tonnes of food a year – perhaps 10 percent of the global output of legumes, roots and tubers, and vegetable crops. It is forecast that by 2050 60 percent of the world’s population will live in cities, and the speed of this shift demands rapid solutions to providing for these urban populations. The challenges go beyond food production, including job creation, community building and waste processing. Urban farming can make a positive impact in all of these areas, thereby also contributing to the UN Sustainable Development Goals 01, 02, 12 and 15.

You can read the entire article here

Back to top

Cracow Urban Farm

How to become a farmer in the city?

The first urban farm in Poland operates since April 2020 in Cracow. It is based on the Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) model. The farm delivers packages from mid-May to late October. To grow vegetables, they use compost and ecological seeds.

Back to top

Edible Plants

Have you ever considered that plants you trample when you walk on the grass can be a rich source of vitamins, minerals and healing substances? Our grandparents did know – they didn’t have as much access to medication and nutritional supplements as we have, so they used what nature offered. We are also slowly returning to the interest in plants as both food and cure. Ground-ivy, common nettle, ground elder and blackberry are plants that grow in our surroundings. During the workshop conducted by Magdalena Oprządek we looked for them in the riparian forest by the Vistula River, in the northern part of Warsaw. From the plants we collected, we made a salad and a marinade.

 

PICKLED GROUND ELDER WITH CURRY

Ingredients:
2 cups young leaves of ground elder,
brine (1 1/2 tablespoon salt per 1 litre water)
1 teaspoon curry
several pepper grains (green or black)
1 garlic clove
1 tablespoon pasteurised vinegar
Preparation:
Wash and dry ground elder. Put the leaves into a scalded 1 litre jar. Add garlic and pepper. Mix a teaspoon of vinegar and curry into the brine and pour over the leaves. Screw on a scalded lid and leave for 5–7 days in room temperature. Stir every day, so that leaves on top do not go mouldy. Both pickled leaves and the water form the jar are an excellent addition to oriental soups.
*based on the book Dzikie kiszonki i inne fermentacje [Wild pickles and other fermentations] by Kaja Nowakowska and Małgorzata Ruszkowska.

FERMENTED BLACKBERRY LEAVES
Ingredients:
blackberry leaves,
glass jar
Preparation:
Collect blackberry leaves (careful with thorns!) and place them in a basket for 1-2 hours, until all critters leave. Crush the leaves in your hand, you can roughly chop them, and pack them tightly into a jar. Leave for 24 hours to start the fermentation process. After that time, take the leaves out and lay them out in a dark, well ventilated place, or put in the over set to 40 C and dry. When the leaves are dried, keep them in a dry, dark container (e.g. tin can). Then you can prepare infusions by pouring a cup of boiling water over a spoonful of dried leaves, and letting it sit for 25 minutes. Drink twice per day.

Worhshop "Edible plants", photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Worhshop "Edible plants", photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Worhshop "Edible plants", photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Worhshop "Edible plants", photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 
Worhshop "Edible plants", photo: Katarzyna Cegłowska / ketti.pl 

Materials from the workshop can be downloaded here (in Polish):

Workshop Edible plants took place on 23rd May 2021 by the Vistula River and was conducted by Magda Oprządek from the Botanical Gardens of the University of Warsaw.

Back to top
We use cookies on our site.
Privacy policy